Healthy emotional transition for mothers first

PDF version Introduction Feeding is a primary event in the life of an infant and young child.

Healthy emotional transition for mothers first

Emotional Wellbeing of New Mums | Mother Care

The physical and emotional changes, and the hormones that stimulate these changes, can leave you wondering what is going on. The experience of giving birth chances you. And, now, the complete dependence of your new child gives you new responsibilities. Those responsibilities might make it difficult to return to healthy patterns of sleeping and eating.

Then, there are the physical changes you are going through. Your body looks different. Hormones stimulate changes that help you transition from pregnancy to breastfeeding.

What a ride those hormones can take you on. Four hormones are responsible for many of the changes you experience as you move from pregnancy to breastfeeding.

Estrogen and Progesterone levels go down immediately with birth because the source of these hormones was the placenta. They go down to post-menopausal levels, so some women experience symptom similar to those of menopause. Yes, it is completely normal, and your hormones will return to higher levels.

The progesterone had a mood-elevating effect, so you may have some emotional let down immediately, though the experience of meeting and bonding with your baby may keep you from noticing much. Prolactin and Oxytocin levels go up as you begin breastfeeding. Prolactin stimulates milk production, as well as stimulating your appetite for milk production.

Emotional health for new parents - COPE

In the first few weeks, oxytocin causes uterine contractions as your uterus returns to is normal size. Oxytocin has a calming effect.

The well-being you feel as you gaze at your nursing baby, the bonding you experience as you establish the breastfeeding relationship, is stimulated by oxytocin. Other factors than hormones also influence the emotional side of breastfeeding. Sleep or fatiguechanges in appetite, and, for many mothers, anemia, can all affect your physical and emotional well-being.

The first two weeks of breastfeeding are critical. Most new mothers experience some baby blues. Keep in mind that there is a difference between the baby blues and postpartum depression.

The baby blues come with the extreme changes in hormones just after birth and with the beginning of breastfeeding. You can lessen the impact of the changes by arranging a support system. Let your friends and family help you if you need a break. Let them cook for you or watch the baby while you take a nap.

For your own physical and emotional health, it is important that you get the sleep your body needs to lessen the effects of hormone changes and to give you the best chance to experience the beauty of those early days with your baby.

Healthy emotional transition for mothers first

Let the oxytocin and prolactin give you all of the calming and bonding help and ride that wave of love for your baby.

Get as much sleep as you can to avoid the effects lack of sleep has on mood, appetite, memory, immunity, and safety.Healthy emotional transition for mothers, first week post-partum Introduction Emotional is an important aspect of life.

We experience joy, anger, and sadness in everyday life. When we do not tend to our emotion needs, psychological complications may occur (Burger & Goddard, ). Other factors than hormones also influence the emotional side of breastfeeding. Sleep (or fatigue), changes in appetite, and, for many mothers, anemia, can all affect your physical and emotional well-being.

The first two weeks of breastfeeding are critical. The transition to parenthood is variable – for lots of reasons. As a result the journey into parenthood can have significant and wide ranging impacts on the emotional health for new parents. Top 5 favourite tips to help care for a new mum's emotional wellbeing by Dr Melanie Strang.

Mothers also reported their infant’s daily cry duration. Results. Average daily crying was related to mothers’ emotional experiences, and relations also existed among the five mental health measures. The aim of this study was to describe expectant mothers’ and fathers’ perceived needs of support during pregnancy.

Twenty-two women and 10 men were interviewed in four focus groups and 13 individual interviews. Systematic text condensation was performed to analyze the data.

The Emotional Side of Breastfeeding | ecobabysteps