Understanding the theories of cognitive process

CIP Definitions and Explanations The Components of Memory Figure 1 above displays the three basic components of CIP 's proposed memory system—sensory memory, short-term memory STMand long-term memory LTM —along with the processes assumed to be responsible for transferring information from one stage to the next. Brief descriptions of the three stages of memory follow: Sensory memory holds information associated with the senses e.

Understanding the theories of cognitive process

Schemas Imagine what it would be like if you did not have a mental model of your world. It would mean that Understanding the theories of cognitive process would not be able to make so much use of information from your past experience or to plan future actions. Schemas are the basic building blocks of such cognitive models, and enable us to form a mental representation of the world.

Wadsworth suggests that schemata the plural of schema be thought of as 'index cards' filed in the brain, each one telling an individual how to react to incoming stimuli or information.

When Piaget talked about the development of a person's mental processes, he was referring to increases in the number and complexity of the schemata that a person had learned. When a child's existing schemas are capable of explaining what it can perceive around it, it is said to be in a state of equilibrium, i.

Piaget emphasized the importance of schemas in cognitive development and described how they were developed or acquired. A schema can be defined as a set of linked mental representations of the world, which we use both to understand and to respond to situations. The assumption is that we store these mental representations and apply them when needed.

For example, a person might have a schema about buying a meal in a restaurant. The schema is a stored form of the pattern of behavior which includes looking at a menu, ordering food, eating it and paying the bill.

This is an example of a type of schema called a 'script. The schemas Piaget described tend to be simpler than this - especially those used by infants. He described how - as a child gets older - his or her schemas become more numerous and elaborate.

Piaget believed that newborn babies have a small number of innate schemas - even before they have had many opportunities to experience the world. These neonatal schemas are the cognitive structures underlying innate reflexes.

CIP's Memory Model

These reflexes are genetically programmed into us. For example, babies have a sucking reflex, which is triggered by something touching the baby's lips. A baby will suck a nipple, a comforter dummyor a person's finger.

Piaget, therefore, assumed that the baby has a 'sucking schema. Shaking a rattle would be the combination of two schemas, grasping and shaking. Assimilation and Accommodation Jean Piaget ; see also Wadsworth, viewed intellectual growth as a process of adaptation adjustment to the world.

Piaget believed that cognitive development did not progress at a steady rate, but rather in leaps and bounds. Equilibrium occurs when a child's schemas can deal with most new information through assimilation.

However, an unpleasant state of disequilibrium occurs when new information cannot be fitted into existing schemas assimilation. Equilibration is the force which drives the learning process as we do not like to be frustrated and will seek to restore balance by mastering the new challenge accommodation.

Once the new information is acquired the process of assimilation with the new schema will continue until the next time we need to make an adjustment to it.

Cognitive Approach | Simply Psychology

Example of Assimilation A 2-year-old child sees a man who is bald on top of his head and has long frizzy hair on the sides. Piaget's 4 Stages of Cognitive Development Piaget proposed four stages of cognitive development which reflect the increasing sophistication of children's thought: Sensorimotor stage birth to age 2 2.

Pre-operational stage from age 2 to age 7 3. Concrete operational stage from age 7 to age 11 4. Each child goes through the stages in the same order, and child development is determined by biological maturation and interaction with the environment. Although no stage can be missed out, there are individual differences in the rate at which children progress through stages, and some individuals may never attain the later stages.

Piaget did not claim that a particular stage was reached at a certain age - although descriptions of the stages often include an indication of the age at which the average child would reach each stage.

Sensorimotor Stage Birth-2 yrs The main achievement during this stage is object permanence - knowing that an object still exists, even if it is hidden. It requires the ability to form a mental representation i.

Preoperational Stage years During this stage, young children can think about things symbolically. This is the ability to make one thing - a word or an object - stand for something other than itself.

Thinking is still egocentricand the infant has difficulty taking the viewpoint of others.Discuss how neuroscience research has contributed to a better understanding of learning and cognitive theory (Bush, ; Dai & Sternberg, ). Behaviorist theory continues to be con- 56 Chapter 3: Applying Learning Theories to Healthcare Practice relative’s room, the visitor may smell offensive odors (UCS) and feel queasy and light.

Understanding the theories of cognitive process

Jan 01,  · The goal of cognitive psychology is to develop and test theories about how the mind works. In this commentary, we address the question of how fMRI can be used to help cognitive psychologists understand cognition.

From understanding how cognitive processes change over the course of child development to looking at how the brain transforms sensory inputs into perceptions, cognitive psychology has helped us gain a deeper and richer understanding of the many mental events that contribute to our daily existence and overall well-being.

Theories of Cognitive Development How Children Develop (4th) Chapter 4 process: no single theory accounts for all of it Theories of cognitive and social development, focus on different capabilities.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development - Wikipedia

understand Accommodation: The process by which people adapt current. Piaget's () theory of cognitive development explains how a child constructs a mental model of the world. He disagreed with the idea that intelligence was a fixed trait, and regarded cognitive development as a process which occurs due to biological maturation and interaction with the environment.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development is a comprehensive theory about the nature and development of human intelligence. It was first created by the Swiss .

Learning theories Behaviorism, Cognitive and Constructivist